Nic Smith

Nic Smith

Walking Hadrian's Wall West to East

Supporting

Total raised so far£0.00

Total plus Gift Aid: £0.00

Target£0.00

Raised offline: £0.00

My story

[p]We successfully completed our challenge! [/p][p]Having started on the walk on Sunday 25th of July 2021 and taking just 4 days, Andy and Nic pushed themselves daily to complete more than 20 miles per day, with their 25kg rucksacks. Throughout the walk Andy and Nic made video updates and took photographs which were posted on the Facebook page, Walking the Wall. We had no idea what to set our target as and didnt expect to have such a strong reaction from friends, family, work collegues and even people who just happened to stumble across the FB page. If you would like to see any of the images or videos please follow the link to four facebook page;[/p][p][br][/p][p]https://www.facebook.com/Walking-the-wall-106619378372189/ [/p][p][br][/p][p]A small but capable team of Serving Royal Navy Sailors are intending to embark on a walk together. [/p][p]The start of a joke you may ask yourself?[/p][p]Not this time.[/p][p]Andy Dannatt, Nigel 'Donk' Fleetwood and Nic Smith are going to walk the route of Hadrian's wall from the West to East (84 Miles). The plan is to camp out each night as we make our journey.[/p][p]We are going to be raising the money for the Naval Children's Charity because each of our families have been tragically impacted by significant childhood illnesses and the charity was there to support our families when we needed it.[/p][p]We will keep you updated with daily reports on Facebook and on this page from the walk which we believe will take 4 days. Andy is going to use his Go Pro to record our walk too. [/p][p]Our walk will take place from the 25th July to the 28th July 2021. We hope that our friends and family will share on their social media pages to get the word out and hopefully we can do ourselves and the charity proud, securing funds to provide support to those who need it in the future.[/p][p]Below you will find our individual back stories and the journeys of our families through the children's medical treatments.[/p][p]Thanks for reading and hopefully donating. We will keep you posted.[/p][p][br][/p][p][b][u]Nigel's Story[/u][/b][/p][p]My name is Nigel and I am a serving Petty Officer (Marine Engineering) in the Royal Navy. I have decided to take on this challenge to try and help fundraise for the Naval Children’s Charity (NCC) as a sign of gratitude for the support that they have given myself and my family through some really difficult times over many years. [/p][p]I am married to my amazing wife and childhood sweetheart Lorraine, and together we have three boys, (well a teenager, a preenager and a 7year old.) We also have a dog, 2 cats and a tortoise. [/p][p]My youngest son, Jacob was born at 27 weeks, (over 3 months premature) and subsequently has many complex medical and health needs. He has been diagnosed with Spastic Quadriplegic Cerebral Palsy, Epilepsy, Unsafe Swallow plus many other conditions. All of which make his life extremely difficult and leave him extremely vulnerable. [/p][p]Due to his broad and complex conditions, there is a huge reliance on having equipment and support services at home to give him the best quality of life possible while also trying to reduce the stress and isolation that the family have felt. It is here that the NCC have support us by helping to fund equipment that has changed his life and that of the family as a whole. [/p][p]Please support us in helping this amazing charity by giving generously. Every penny counts and I can guarantee that all monies raised will go to helping a service family in need when they really need it. [/p][p][br][/p][p][b][u]Andy's Story[/u][/b][/p][p]My name is Andy and I am currently serving as a Petty Officer (Marine Engineering) in the Royal Navy. I decided to take on this challenge to raise money for the NCC as it helped out my family when we needed support.[/p][p][br][/p][p]In 2015 my youngest daughter, Ayla was diagnosed with an Optic Nerve Glioma after being referred for an emergency MRI scan after an eye appoint. This came as a hammer blow to us as a family as she had no symptoms. At the time of diagnosis Ayla was just a happy and playful 3 years old. What was to come was anything but plain sailing for her or our family.[/p][p]Ayla had to have an implantable port (button) fitted to allow access for blood tests and infusions, she endured 20 months of chemotherapy with lots of admissions to Queen Alexandra hospital, Portsmouth. The treatment hit her hard, she lost a lot of weight and lost her hair. It did not phase her, she just got on with it like the little trooper she is. [/p][p]After she finished her regime of chemotherapy, we started getting back to a bit of normality with a planned return to the hospital to see how effective the treatment had been. After one of her regular MRI scans, the results showed that the tumour had grown again. This meant a new treatment plan was started and she had to endure another 15 months of chemotherapy and visits to QA and Southampton General Hospital. Thankfully, this time the chemotherapy was not as harsh on her body, not something you get used to saying but I suppose the body understands it better the second time, this meant that things were a little smoother and more manageable. Thankfully, she has now finished the chemotherapy treatment, so we are again trying to get back to normal. [/p][p]The reason we chose the NCC was because they have supported me with a disability pushchair and support for me, my wife Sandie and daughters Anya and Ayla.[/p][p][br][/p][p][b][u]Nic's Story[/u][/b][/p][p]My name is Nic and I am a Sub Lieutenant in the Royal Navy. In September 2016 at only 22 months old, my son Aiden was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL). It started like any other illness, he was tired, pale, and generally out of sorts. He had visited the doctors and they believed he just had a virus and would get over it. After a couple of weeks, we noticed that there was no improvement, so we took him back to the doctors. After more checks they still felt that it was likely to be a virus and he was just run down. He returned to nursery, but the staff could see the decline in him. They urged us to return to the doctors again. So, we did and saw another doctor. He checked Aiden over and his reaction stunned us. He told us that he could feel some inflammation of his spleen and was going to get us to Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth for tests. We arrived at the hospital soon after and blood tests were taken. Within an hour we had the result and our world changed. His blood tests showed that he had low levels of Haemoglobin and platelets. He was booked in for a transfer to the Southampton General Hospital the next morning but spent the night hooked up to drips and infusion machines in QA.[/p][p]Once we arrived at Southampton, Aiden was subjected to a Lumbar puncture and a bone marrow aspiration. The results of those procedures confirmed the type of Leukaemia and the treatment plan. Three years and three months of treatment consisting of high dose Chemotherapy in the hospital, nightly chemotherapy given at home, high dose steroids and every weekend having Antibiotics to prevent infection. He had a central line (Wiggly) fitted into his chest to give access for infusions to take place and regularly had to attend the hospital for Lumbar punctures with more chemotherapy injected and bone marrow aspirations. [/p][p][br][/p][p]It was a long road, but Aiden responded well to the treatment throughout. Yes, there were bad days, but he showed nothing but strength the whole way through. He completed his Treatment officially in March 2020 but as with so many people our plans to celebrate were curtailed by COVID. Aiden finally got to ring the bell this year in a small ceremony which his school were happy to be a part of. [/p][p][br][/p][p]It is not until you start off on a journey like this that you realise how things can hit you financially very quickly. Parking in hospitals is not cheap, even with the discounts for those under long care regimes. Meals are difficult subjects for anyone in hospital, a lack of cooking facilities means you are limited in choices. The hospital meals are of poor quality, and they do not cater for children at all but going to use the restaurant is expensive with a simple meal like pizza and chips costing £9 per person. [/p][p]The NCC supported my family when I needed the help and I want to be able to do what I can to raise the awareness of the charity, raise funds and give people the opportunity to not only see Jacob, Ayla, and Aiden’s stories but also to reassure them that if they ever need help, then support is on hand with the NCC.[/p][p][br][/p][p][br][/p]
Walking Hadrian's Wall West to East image 1
Walking Hadrian's Wall West to East image 2
Walking Hadrian's Wall West to East image 3
Walking Hadrian's Wall West to East image 4
Walking Hadrian's Wall West to East image 5
Walking Hadrian's Wall West to East image 6

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Supporters


Aug 10, 2021

Anonymous

Well done marra, I'd have got a bus after the first mile, some achievement!

£20.00

plus £5.00 Gift Aid


Aug 10, 2021

Aunty Ann and Ol

Congratulations for the hard work to all 3 of you.

£50.00

plus £12.50 Gift Aid


Aug 10, 2021

Anonymous

£15.00

plus £3.75 Gift Aid


Aug 7, 2021

Laura F

Well done boys!!!


Aug 5, 2021

Wendy Fawcus

Well done lads.

£10.00


Aug 5, 2021

Kim watson

Well done lads

£10.00

plus £2.50 Gift Aid


Aug 5, 2021

Finchy

£10.00


Aug 2, 2021

Sue Beach

Well done boys. A worthy cause. Good luck to all of you and your families

£15.00

plus £3.75 Gift Aid


Jul 29, 2021

Anonymous

From Derek’s boss

£15.00

plus £3.75 Gift Aid


Jul 29, 2021

Fran Mills

£5.00

plus £1.25 Gift Aid

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