Nick Gill

Nick Gill

Nick Gill's marathon effort

Supporting

Total raised so far£0.00

Total plus Gift Aid: £0.00

Target£0.00

Raised offline: £0.00

My story

[p]Here's what happened: [/p][p]THE London Marathon was always going to be tough, but Sunday proved to be more difficult than I ever could’ve imagined.[/p] [p]Throughout my training I’ve written plenty about the weather, and it had a big part to play at the weekend.[/p] [p]After my obsessive forecast checking during the week, the reality was a chilly start but a warm and sunny day by the time the gun went at 10am.[/p] [p]I was across the line in just over four minutes as I took in the staggering crowds and hi-fived countless youngsters over the first few miles.[/p] [p]I had initially set off at 8min 30s pace targeting a 3h 45m finish time which my training had geared me up for, but I soon realised it was too hot to keep that up.[/p] [p]From there on, I was clocking nine minute miles with reassuring frequency and felt good. All the time I had that one thought on repeat – I’m actually running the London Marathon.[/p] [p]Seeing some friends just before the six mile point gave me a boost and running along the side of the route as the crowd repeatedly shouted the name on my vest was quite something.[/p] [p]Turning the corner after 12 miles and seeing Tower Bridge felt even better. I’ve watched the marathon from the comfort of my sofa for countless years and the image of the BBC interviewing fun runners at this point comes most readily.[/p] [p]I said to a woman next to me ‘this is it’, although she quickly reminded me the race started at 20 miles. Touché.[/p] [p]I reached the half way point in about 1h 56m so I knew I had a chance of finishing in under four hours if I could just keep a steady pace.[/p] [p]At this point it was getting hot but seeing a woman running in a wedding dress next to me put it all into perspective so I told myself it was a case of pushing on.[/p] [p]The next thing on my mind was getting to mile 15 and heading out to the Isle of Dogs where my family lay in wait.[/p] [p]After running through an underpass I came back out into the sunshine to see familiar faces and cheers of encouragement (and a rather epic home-made sign).[/p] [p]My mind was clearly starting to clog up at that point as no sooner had I given them all a wave my thoughts turned to what felt like an almighty task of making way across other runners to get to the Lucozade station on the other side of the road. It seemed tortuous at the time.[/p] [p]Having read many guides to the course, as I started to feel the effects of the heat I reminded myself that many had said that runners found the Isle of Dogs section one of the most challenging. Again, I steeled myself and kept running.[/p] [p]After another cheer from friends at 16 miles I checked my watch and saw that I was still on target to finish in under four hours.[/p] [p]But after 17 miles something went badly wrong. I remember feeling light-headed and needing some water at the next mile point but unfortunately I never made it. I don’t remember it myself, but at about 17.5 miles I collapsed.[/p] [p]Maybe I didn’t drink enough and perhaps my body was not acclimatised to the hotter conditions. Either way, something happened, and almost without warning.[/p] [p]Waking up in a St John Ambulance tent was a bit surreal, especially given I was unable to move and felt unbelievably hot despite being covered in ice.[/p] [p]My first thoughts were ‘what have I done?’, before the realisation that loved ones may still be waiting for me out on the course.[/p] [p]My mind was in over-drive, hearing that my temperature was 40 degrees C and that I may be taken to hospital, but a paramedic called Donna did a wonderful job at keeping me calm.[/p] [p]Although when she asked if I would be doing another marathon, ‘never again’ was the immediate answer.[/p] [p]But in time – yes that again – my condition improved and the reality that I was in safe hands allowed me to think beyond the next few minutes.[/p] [p]After a couple of hours recuperation, a journey to the finish line to collect my belongings via a sweeper bus allowed me to ponder the thought, and seeing what I had not quite been able to achieve has only increased the motivation to succeed.[/p] [p]Above all though, the care that I received from St John Ambulance – all volunteers – has given me a reason to run the London Marathon again, if only to say a huge thank you. I actually made a donation to the cause after speaking to a volunteer at the Expo three days earlier, so call that Karma, if you will.[/p] [p]Now being able to reflect on the experience there’s a huge sense of disappointment at not finishing, but also of relief that I have been able to fully recover from quite an ordeal.[/p] [p]Despite a few playful jibes at work, the support from everyone has been amazing and the donations for the MS Trust have kept coming in regardless. Ultimately that is what matters, that I have been able to raise a significant amount for a wonderful charity.[/p] [p]For now my own ambition can wait, and maybe 2015 will be my time. But next year? Never.[/p][p]---------------- [/p][p]The build up:[/p][p]Bear with me.[/p][p]About 10 years ago I spent a week at The Comet newspaper on work experience where one of the reporters had recently run the London Marathon...I (stupidly) set myself a target of running it by the time I was 24. I guess I thought anything older was beyond me.[/p][p]And now here I am, working as a journalist at The Comet as a 24-year-old having been given the chance by the MS Trust to achieve my goal. I've never run more than 13 miles before so 26.2 is going to be a real challenge. I'll be training at least three times a week through to April and have set myself a rather ambitious target of running it in 3 hours 45 minutes.[/p][p]The reason I want to help the MS Trust is simple. For the past two years in my job I've been covering the town of Letchworth and this year wrote a feature about the the charity. I was amazed to hear the story of Chris Jones, who was diagnosed with MS while living in Letchworth and decided something had to be done when she realised there was so little information to help her.[/p][p]Almost two decades on the charity is still based in the town but provides free information and support for people nationwide. It's an incredible achievement but without funding can't continue. There is still no cure for MS and the money raised will help fund further research while supporting MS sufferers.[/p][p]To run the London Marathon will mean so much to me but I can't do it without your help. I've donated £100 to the MS Trust to enter the marathon and anything you can spare to help me reach my goal would be brilliant. Cheers guys, I promise I won't bug you for a long time after this, and sorry for the ramble. [/p]

Event

Charity

Supporters


May 9, 2013

Chris and Cat

As we said we'd sponsor you £1 a mile technically you owe us £8.70 change... but we'll waive that as it's all for a good cause ;-) Seriously, though, we're proud of the effort you put in throughout training and on the (hot) day.

£26.20

plus £6.55 Gift Aid


Apr 21, 2013

Shonsie B

Good luck Nicholas Gillious! The sun is shinning for you today! Enjoy x

£10.00

plus £2.50 Gift Aid


Apr 21, 2013

Anonymous

Hope the run went well mate. Well done.

£20.00

plus £5.00 Gift Aid


Apr 20, 2013

Skinners

Nick best of luck and well done Colin Sue and Girls

£20.00


Apr 20, 2013

Glenn Heritage

Maybe next year you could do it in fancy dress. Good luck from the Heritages!

£40.00

plus £10.00 Gift Aid


Apr 20, 2013

Anonymous

Incredible charity, best of luck for tomorrow.

£20.00

plus £5.00 Gift Aid


Apr 19, 2013

Matt Gonzales

Good luck you journalist

£51.00

plus £12.75 Gift Aid


Apr 19, 2013

dawn

go on Nick.. run for your life!!!

£50.00

plus £12.50 Gift Aid


Apr 19, 2013

Danielle linggood

In awe of you for doing this nick! Best of luck hope you smash the time you're aiming for!

£5.00

plus £1.25 Gift Aid


Apr 15, 2013

Carol Turpin

Good luck - hope it goes well

£20.00

plus £5.00 Gift Aid

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